Winterton PCC

Winterton PCC stands for Winterton Parochial Church Council. It has a legal responsibility for our church.

The Parish system

What does the PCC do?

Who are the PCC members?

When does the PCC meet?

What responsibility does the PCC have?

What do the Churchwardens do?

The parish system

An ecclesiastical parish is the geographical area committed to the care of a Parish Priest. The parish system developed gradually in medieval times. Everyone in England lives in a parish, whether or not they attend the parish church. To see a map showing the extent of Winterton parish click here.

Winterton: All Saints parish has two Churchwardens and a Parochial Church Council or PCC. PCCs were first given legal status in 1919. Prior to that time the administration and finances of the parish church were in the hands of the Vicar and Churchwardens though the Vestry meeting also had influence on the affairs of the parish church [see Parish Officers].

What does the PCC do?

Winterton PCC has a duty to work with and support the Vicar in all the activities of our local church, look after the church building and its contents, manage the church's finances and is the means of communication with the Deanery, Diocese and wider Church.

Who are the PCC members?

Elections take place each year. For a list of current members click PCC members. PCC members are elected at the Annual Parochial Church meeting which is held before 30th April. To be eligible you must be over 16, on the Electoral Roll, baptised, confirmed and a regular communicant.

When does the PCC meet?

The PCC meets at least 4 times a year. It is usually chaired by the Vicar. The PCC has a Standing Committee to carry on routine business between meetings.

What responsibility does the PCC have?

The PCC co-operates with the Vicar in promoting in the parish the whole mission of the Church, pastoral, evangelistic, social & ecumenical; considers and discusses matters concerning the Church of England or any other matters of religious or public interest and gives advice to the Diocesan or Deanery Synod.

The PCC is responsible for maintenance and repair of the church building, inside and out, especially work recommended by the inspecting architect in the Quinquennial (5 yearly) Report. The PCC looks after ‘movable goods' [e.g. chairs, rails, candlesticks, lectern, Communion plate, vestments]. This includes seeing to insurance, security, and health and safety matters including disability issues. The PCC is involved in any application to the Diocesan Advisory Committee for a faculty (permission to effect a change to the church, or its contents, or the churchyard).

The PCC sets the annual budget for All Saints' Church. This includes payment of the parish share (most of which goes to providing for the stipend or salary of the Vicar), expenses of clergy, other ministers and church officers and charitable giving. It also includes expenditure necessary for the upkeep and insurance of the building and its contents. For an example of the PCC budget see 2008 Annual Report and Financial Statement

Under the terms of the Charities Act, PCC members are charitable trustees, responsible for ensuring that money and other assets are managed prudently, in accordance with the church's beliefs and aims.

The PCC Treasurer deals with these financial matters, but (s)he acts on behalf of the PCC, carrying out its policy.

What do the Churchwardens do?

Churchwardens have a duty to represent the people of the parish and work in close partnership with the Vicar. They are expected to lead the parishioners by setting a good example and by modeling and encouraging unity and cooperation. Churchwardens are legally responsible for all the property and movable goods belonging to a parish church. They have a duty under ecclesiastical law to keep an up to date terrier (written record) of the property and an inventory of the valuables, and to produce these lists for inspection at a visitation by the Archdeacon. The day-to-day maintenance of church buildings and contents is delegated to the churchwardens. The contribution the churchwardens make to all aspects of our church's work, both material and spiritual, is of vital significance. They undertake a demanding, though rewarding, and very important job.

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